BOWS STOLEN FROM PETER OXLEY, ENGLAND

AVMA Noticeboard Missing Instrument Register BOWS STOLEN FROM PETER OXLEY, ENGLAND

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    Alex
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    This notice has been received from Peter Oxley. If you have any knowledge of any of these bows please contact the British Transport Police, details as per the following:

    PETER OXLEY
    Bowmaker
    8 Old High St., Headington, Oxford OX3 9HN
    tel: 01865 741909

    Major theft of violin bows, 4th October 2010

    On the 4th October 2010, a bow box was stolen from the National Express 15.00 train service from Liverpool Street to Norwich. The bow box contained 11 bows detailed below.

    Any information regarding the following list should be reported immediately to the police as outlined here:

    Name of Police Station: British Transport Police, Colchester
    Address: Platform 4, Colchester Railway Station, Colchester, Essex, CO1 1XD
    Telephone: 01473 693715
    Crime ref: B08/085410/2010
    Investigating officer: D.C. 2461 Reed

    List of stolen items

    1: An ironwood bow, school of N. Maline, ca 1840

    The stick in almost black ironwood; the head without its ivory headplate. The frog is in ebony of the ‘open’ type (that is, with no ferrule, pearl slide or backplates). The button is of bone or ivory, split along the length by the rusting screw shaft. The thread of the brass eye/screw mechanism had perished, so the whole ensemble was held together with masking tape. The bow is without hair and generally in tatty condition.

    2: A fine pernambuco stick (no frog and button), ca. 1880

    The round stick is of beautiful dark, veined pernambuco. the style of the head is of the ‘Martin school’. The stick is in excellent condition.

    3: A nickel-mounted, ironwood violin bow by Etienne Pajeot, ca. 1835.

    The round stick is in striking dark ironwood mixed with lighter brown streaks. The head is slanting with sharply cut chamfers which taper down dramatically from wide to very thin (the thinnest point being where the chamfers meet the headplate). The frog is of good quality ebony; the backplate is in one-piece; the pearl slide is of original ormeaux pearl. The frog is decorated with pearl eyes. The Button is in 3 pieces from nickel and ebony. The lapping is a ‘tinsel and silk’ type. The bow is overall in excellent condition and has a certificate of authenticity from Bernard Millant.

    4: A nickel-mounted violin bow by Etienne Pajeot, ca. 1820

    The round stick is of dark red-brown pernambuco. The head is typical of the first period, being very ‘pinched’ towards the ridge. The frog has very large oval-shaped pearl inlays in the sides. There is no backplate and no underslide. Behind the pearl slide (which is a greenish awabi type – not original) is a pearl eye inlay (where the small back-plate normally would be). The frog, though stylistically correct, is not original to the stick. The button is in 3 pieces, of nickel and ebony. The lapping is of silk and looks original to the bow. The bow is overall in excellent condition and has a certificate from Isaac Salchow.

    5: A nickel-mounted brazil-wood violin bow from the workshop of Nicolas Maline, ca. 1850.

    The round brazil-wood stick is of a dark purple-brown colour. The frog is of a lower quality ebony and is decorated with pearl eyes. There is a crack in the frog running along the length of the frog, parallel to the underslide (and about 8mm below the underslide). The button is in 3 pieces from nickel and ebony. The bow is in tatty condition.

    6: A silver-mounted ‘Vuillaume’ style violin bow by Charles Peccatte, ca. 1880.

    The round stick is in light chocolate-brown pernambuco. The head is of the ‘Simon style’ and the headplate is very tatty with large cracks. The frog, which is made in the ‘Vuillaume’ style, has a lens traversing the width of the frog, fitted through the centre of the pearl eyes. The original micro-photo within this lens has now been destroyed, leaving no evidence of the picture. The silver ferrule is not original to the bow and does not fit well to the frog. There is a large crack running from the ferrule (on the audience side of the frog) along the length of frog. There is a crack in the thumb-projection. The button is in 3 pieces from silver and ebony; the back ring is ‘capped’. The bow is overall in tatty condition.

    7: A silver-mounted bow by Peter Oxley ca. 2000

    The round stick is in dense golden-brown pernambuco, the frog in ebony with sterling-silver metal parts. The pearl slide and pearl eyes are in ormeaux pearl. The button is in 3 pieces, of ebony and silver. The lapping is tinsel and silk. The bow is branded P.F.H. Oxley. This bow was bought in 2000 by a collector and it is unused, in perfect condition today.

    8: A gold-mounted violin bow by W.E.Hill and Sons ca. 1890

    The octagonal stick is of beautiful light, golden-brown, flamed and figured pernambuco. The head is a ‘Tourte model’ with an ivory headplate. The frog is in 1st-choice ebony and mounted with 18 carat gold metal parts. The pearl is of the highly ‘mottled’ type (as typically used by early English bowmakers). The sides of the frog are decorated with ring and eye ensembles. The ebony between the ring and the eye is endgrain. The button is in 3 pieces, of gold and ebony and I think that the back ring is capped. The bow is branded W.E. HILL & SONS and is in superb condition throughout.

    9: A silver-mounted violin bow by James Tubbs, ca. 1880.

    The round stick is in dark purple-brown pernambuco (not stained dark brown, as many later Tubbs’ were). The headplate is silver. The frog is of very good quality ebony and mounted wityh silver metal parts. The backplate is in one-piece. The ferrule appears not to abut the ebony very well (there is a large gap between the silver and the ebony). The button is in one piece (that is, made from a silver tube overlaying the ebony body. The bow is branded either J.Tubbs or Jas Tubbs. The bow is overall in excellent condition.

    10: A silver-mounted violin bow by Eugene Sartory, ca. 1905.

    The round stick is in light golden-brown, slightly flamed pernambuco. The head bears the original ivory headplate which has an ‘X’ scratched into it behind the mortice. The ebony of the headplate is in one piece. The frog is of good quality (but not of the very densest) ebony, mounted with silver metal parts. The sides of the frog are decorated with ring and eye ensembles. The button is in one piece: silver overlaying ebony. There are scratches on the handle and on the bottom 3 facets, between the stick mortice and the end of the stick, there are the initials D.W. scratched into the pernambuco. The lapping is tinsel and silk. The bow is branded E. SARTORY A PARIS in the usual place and also underneath the lapping. The bow is in excellent condition throughout and has a certificate from Bernard Millant

    11: A silver-mounted violin bow by Pierre Simon, ca. 1870.

    The round stick is in beautiful, dark red-brown, veined pernambuco. The head is a ‘swanhead’ model, which is extremely rare in a Simon violin bow (a swanhead model has no clean-cut chamfers; rather, in place of chamfers, the whole back of the head is rounded off and blended softly into the sides of the head. The frog is of 1st-quality ebony and is fitted with silver metal parts. The small heel-plate (petit talon) is noticeably and unusually short. The sides of the frog are decorated with pearl eyes. The frog had had a large crack in the thumb-projection which I had just restored. The button is in three pieces of silver and ebony. The lapping is solid-silver wire. The bow is branded SIMON, PARIS. The bow is overall in excellent condition throughout and has a certificate from Bernard Millant.

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